Crusoe and Oakley, the Exploring Dachshunds


Crusoe and Oakley are experts in exploring… Here are their advice for other dogs:

– Watch & listen… carefully!
-Take aim… fire!
– Try to keep up
– Inspect every tree
– Use logs to your advantage
– Regroup often
– Don’t give up

More tips:

– Kick it into high gear
– Stealth is in the underground
– Don’t drink dirty puddle water!!
– Ambush critter holes
– Remove roots in the way of your mission
– Know no boundaries
– Refuel with blueberries
– Restore ears to factory settings
– Don’t forget your paws signals
– Work on your hops
– Triple check holes
– Don’t be afraid to get dirty
– Stop to enjoy the view
– Eat some grass
– “Hops” are handy for tall grass
– Play some fetch
– And when in doubt… pee on it!

Henry Sleeps on the Dashboard!


Do you know those bobble-headed dogs that you place on your car’s dashboard?

Well, here’s Henry, and he’s a happy dog who loves to keep his nose ahead of everyone else. His owner says: “This is Henry sleeping in his favorite spot on the dashboard of my big truck, a 2006 Freightliner Century Class.” This dog’s head does not bob, but he seems quite relaxed, and he’s rocking out to a 1980’s music station.

(Obviously, it’s not a good idea to drive with your dog on the dashboard or film him up there while driving.)

Source: examiner.com

Jerry & The Fetch Machine


Jerry, the Dachshund, doesn’t need help to play with his ball. He has got a funny, but strange machine that plays fetch with him!

His owner developed it especially for the dog, “because I thought my dog Jerry, might like it and that it would be something fun for me to build.

So after two years of on and off work, with many safety features such as IR proximity sensors to protect Jerry and my son from the machine, I finally complete[d] it.”

Jerry’s owner ended up throwing more balls than the machine! According to the computer, Jerry played with the machine by himself only 3 times. And that the proof that dogs need to play with their owners!

Source: dogheirs.com

Dachshund 101


The Dachshund’s long, low-slung body allows it to get into and move freely inside the confines of a den or tunnel, without compromising the required jaw and body strength to overcome its quarry.

Its self-confidence, hunting instinct, keen nose and loud voice likewise are of significant aid in hunting underground.

Agility, freedom of movement and endurance are required for the Dachshund’s work, and its gait is fluid and smooth.

The Dachshund has an energetic, enjoyable expression.

Each of the 3 coat varieties has unique attributes:

  • the smooth is short and shining, providing some protection against the elements;
  • the longhair is sleek, occasionally slightly wavy, offering fairly more protection;
  • the wire has tight, thick and hard hair with a finer undercoat, offering maximal protection.

The Dachshund is daring, inquisitive and always up for adventure.

It likes to hunt and dig, tracking by scent and going to ground after game.

It’s independent however will join in its family’s activities anytime given an opportunity.

It’s good with children in its own family, however a few may well snap at strange children.

Most are reserved with strangers. Some bark.

Source: animalplanet.com

9 Tips to Train a Dachshund Puppy


Here are a few tips to train a Doxie puppy:

  • Be consistent.
  • Commence working with your dog early, the moment he arrives.
  • In no way punish your dog, ignore, move away, or turn your back… Say ‘No’ with a firm tone.
  • Be patience

Here’s an adorable video of a sassy Dachshund puppy:

  • Use plenty of praise when reinforcing behaviour.
  • A relaxed pleasant tone of voice is essential when giving positive commands.
  • Always praise or reprimand instantly the good or bad behavior.
  • Limit the distractions, so your dog can focus on you.
  • Never train you dog if he just had a meal, or is tired.

Dachshund Puppy Escape!


Waldo, the Dachshund, has only 10 weeks.

…but he has already developed a surprising skill!

He’s a skilled escape artist.

Here’s Waldo, aka Houdini, doing one of his escapes:

How to Take Care of a Dachshund


If you’re getting a Dachshund here are a few basic tips to take care of him or her:

1. Learn how to hold your dachshund

You cannot hold them just like normal dogs due to their long backs. Hold their ends whilst supporting their back with your other hand. Even though it’s an uncomfortable position in the beginning, after a while you’ll get accustomed to it. Practice with something light initially because you might hurt your dachshund. Ensure you never hold them by their paws or head.

Here’s a cute video of mini Dachshund puppy playing with a mirror…

2. Avoid letting them climb stairs or go down stairs

When dachshunds climb stairs, it puts pressure on their backs as a result of their height. Their backs fold the wrong way. When they go down stairs, a great deal of pressure is placed on the discs with each step. Always carry them when you’d like them to come upstairs or downstairs.

3. Get a light leash

In case your dachshund’s leash is too heavy, you’ll end up lugging the dog throughout the block rather than taking him for a walk. Ensure that your leash is made out of light material, and that the metal clips aren’t too large. A very good choice of a leash is one particularly made for smaller dogs.

4. House train them

Begin with getting them to urinate on eco friendly puppy pads or newspaper. After that, progressively put less and less newspaper on the floor. As soon as all the paper is gone, take them for walks. Prize them in case they do their business. Anytime they mark their territory outside, say, “Good dog, good duty. Good Fito.” Obviously, replace “Fito” with your dog’s name.

5. Brush their teeth

Get started by rubbing their teeth with meat. (It sounds weird, obviously!) This will make them comfy with your hands in their mouth. After that use dog toothpaste. This should be done at a young age.

6. Give them toys

This is particularly crucial while your dog is teething. They will want to chew on something, and in case you don’t provide them, they will choose a nice expensive shoe out of your closet as an alternative.

7. Let your dog run

As a result of their short legs, they require to run around frequently. In case they don’t exercise, they may become obese. This is particularly bad for dachshunds because their stomachs weigh down their backs. In case your dachshund becomes obese, they’ll probably come across back problems too.

8. Don’t let your dachshund jump

Although it may look really cute, this is likewise bad for their backs. In case they can stand up on their hind legs, this is okay. In case they jump very high and fall back down, do not let them do it.

9. Clip you dog’s nails

Get a special tool for this, given that you do not want to hit the quick. In case you don’t think you are able to do this, leave it to the vet.

10. Wash your dog

Employ special dog shampoo for this. Except if your dog has a skin problem, there’s no need to wash him or her other than for your own enjoyment, even though it’s most likely also good for your dachs. Shoot to wash him or her every couple of months.

11. Brush your dog

Ensure you give particular attention to the stomach and ears. Ensure your dog does not get matted hair, as they are painful to your dog and hard to remove.

12. Do stuff with your dachshund!

In case you’re enthusiastic about any dog sports, get your dachshund into them! Dachshunds can compete in conformation, agility, obedience, flyball, and much more!

Source: wikihow.com

Sweet Dreams Martin!


Have trouble getting your Doxie to bed? Here’s how to do it…

Martin gets a special rubdown every night. He sleeps in small bed right alongside owners bed.

Martin is actually a 13 year old senior with a severe heart issue, however thanks to the right medications he’s lived a long, full life.

Martin is a rescue dog. He was adopted from Central Texas Dachshund Rescue back in 2005.

Dachshund Dines With Tigers


The Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Park’s mission is to provide lifelong homes for abandoned, misplaced and abused animals, as well as those animals whose owners can no longer care for them.

To date, the park has rescued more than 1,400 animals and placed over 1,200 in zoos and sanctuaries around the world.

Watch Weenie dog Rabbit dinning with his tiger buddy Geneva, at the G.W. Interactive Zoo:

Source: gwzoo.org

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